Clicky

Search:

Books for Our Brains

July 26, 2020 by  
Filed under blog

In last week’s blog, I talked about an accident that knocked me out cold for about 20 or so minutes and gave me a concussion. That incident was a real wake-up call. The accident could have been much worse. Concussions cause extreme dizziness and really mess with your brain. I am forgetting so many things now.

Yesterday, I was talking to my son and asked him the status of one of our big commercial properties. He said, “Dad, I already answered that same question a couple times, don’t you remember?” I had to admit that I didn’t!

The good news about most concussions is that, over time, the body and brain heal and the person gets back to normal. But that wake-up call strongly reminded me of just how vulnerable we all are and, yes, NOBODY gets out of this world alive. I think most of us can think back to when we were kids. We rarely thought about death and kind of felt like it would never happen to us. But death does cross our minds a lot more often the older we get.

In the last few days, I got another wake-up call. I am in the process of updating and editing my book, How to Ignite Your Passion for Living. In doing that, I’ve been amazed at my own words written years ago and I’m relearning a few things that I’d forgotten. My own book is really a big motivator for me, all these years later.

I’ll never forget the great advice given to me by my mentor, Paul J. Meyer. He said that rather than reading lots and lots of self-help and motivation books, we should find the best ones and read them over and over. It’s amazing how much we forget and that’s why we should re-read those great books, the ones that helped us in various parts of our lives. His advice has been such a great help to me in so many ways. By the way, Paul J. Meyer, considered a pioneer of the self-improvement industry, passed away back in 2009 but still, to date, has sold more than any other author in his field.

Let me end by suggesting that you make a list of the best books you’ve ever read and add to that list books that your friends, family, or others highly recommended. Then set you mind on reading them again and see if that is not motivational and of great help.

Small Goals Add up to Big Success

July 19, 2020 by  
Filed under blog

I had a huge setback since I wrote my last post. I got knocked unconscious for about 20 minutes and ended up with a concussion. I was hauling 2 big garbage cans down our driveway and fell to the hard pavement, cutting me up pretty bad. The strange thing is I don’t remember any of that or even walking back to the house.

I woke up the next morning and saw all the bandages on. My wife asked me how I felt and I still couldn’t remember a thing. And, wow, does a concussion give you a spinning head, loss of balance, shaky eyesight and, if that’s not enough, it plays with your brain and messes up your thinking.

So, now I have a new goal which is to get better as quickly as possible. I’m preaching to myself about goal setting and how to reach that goal. What I write now about goal setting can apply to almost any goal.

I will never forget the incredible Joe Simpson and the goals that he set to save his life. Joe fell high in the frozen mountains of Peru resulting in a compound fracture in his leg that left his shin bone shoved up into his kneecap. He set his mind on a huge goal which was simply not to die. He broke that big goal into small, 20-minute steps. He would pick a spot maybe a hundred meters ahead, look at his watch and say to himself, “I am going to reach that spot in 20 minutes.” And, yes, that big goal of survival broken down into small goals eventually got him to safety and saved the life of Joe Simpson.

The huge lesson I learned from his story, and one that we all should take note of, is to first set the big goals that we want to achieve and, then, break it down into small doable steps. This is so very important!

That is exactly what I began doing after my accident. With a concussion, your symptoms can last anywhere from a couple weeks to months and even years. We all need to remember that with almost every goal you will experience starts and stops and, sometimes, there is even some backtracking. Know that it helps not to get overly discouraged and having small goals and small successes really helps with that.

So, that is my plan and I will stick with it till I am totally better. One small step at a time.

The Influence of Self-Talk

July 12, 2020 by  
Filed under blog

 

We all do it – some of it is very good and some is very negative. I’m talking about all of our self-talk. The good news, as you already know, is that you can somewhat control whether your self-talk is helping or hurting you. And that, my dear followers, is all about your brain and what you choose to let dominate and rule. Sadly, most often, self-talk is negative. It’s hurting you and keeping you from reaching your full potential.

Self -talk should say:

  1. This is something I can do.
  2. I’m so looking forward to this.
  3. I can do this very well.
  4. This is going to make me what I want to be and get me where I want to be.

But self-talk can say:

  1. I can’t do this.
  2. I’m not good enough.
  3. I’m not going to be able to pull this off.
  4. Why do things always happen like this?
  5. I’m afraid I will fail.

As Henry Ford famously said, “If you think you can, or if you think you can’t, either way, you’re right!”

Think about this when playing golf. If you think you will hit the ball into the water, you probably will. The body follows the mind. It listens to the self-talk. It believes you. The body says, “Your wish is my command.”

I’ll never forget my self-talk as I was playing in this one tennis tournament. I got to a crucial point where I knew that I could not afford to double-fault. As I hit the net on my first serve, my self-chatter was very negative and said, “Wow, I just can’t double fault here.” Ouch!

What a negative thought and message I sent to my muscles. My mind probably only heard the word “double fault” and that’s exactly what I did. My second serve went long—I pretty much did exactly what I programmed my mind to do. My wish was the body’s command.

The point I’m trying to make is that life is lived mainly inside your head, so you’ve got to know what’s in your mind and how your mind works and the great influence of self-talk!

We all need to understand how the mind works and that you can control the self-talk and the self-chatter. You need to know how to direct the self-talk that’s hurting you and your life and keeping you from your full potential.

I learned a great lesson from that tennis double fault. From the terrible loss that day, I went on to win 4 gold medals at the Huntsman Senior games held each year in southern Utah. Before every match I would have some very positive self-talk with myself, saying things like, “Mark, you have a great serve and a super topspin forehand and a great underspin backhand and you will win this match today!” And yes, I did.

The bottom line is, we all need to practice controlling our self-talk and make it very positive. It’s pretty much all between your ears and mind. Sure, sometimes we will lose but if you are using a ton of positive self-talk, you will find yourself a winner in many, many situations – in sports, business, and relationships. Try it and you will see.

Boosting Your Daily Energy

July 5, 2020 by  
Filed under blog

In these times of staying at home and there being a lack of social life we need ways to boost our energy. So, here’s 12 proven ways to boost your energy that have worked for me. Hope they help you a bit too!

  1. Set exciting goals that will put your big dreams into action and be sure to add a timeframe and an exciting game plan to those goals.
  2. A daily “to do” list, looked at or thought about in the morning adds extra energy to your day.
  3. Eat more nutritious foods.
  4. Drink green tea to overcome a mid-morning slump.
  5. Get plenty of exposure to natural light.
  6. Ease your stress by simplifying your life and mainly, or exclusively, pursue your life’s priority items. Delegate the rest.
  7. Heal yourself by being grateful and loving and letting go of all anger.
  8. Think positive thoughts to stimulate those good neurotransmitters called endorphins.
  9. Play and exercise hard to release more endorphins and dopamine.
  10. Get more sleep.
  11. A few minutes of yoga stretching will give you a morning boost, along with your favorite cup of java or tea.
  12. Listening to your favorite music. For some people it may be music with a heart pounding beat while for others it may be inspirational symphonic music.

Whether it’s for work or play, family or friends, we all need more energy, especially as we age. So, try a few of these above and add to the list with your own energy boosting actions.