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Recognizing Reality

February 26, 2016 by  
Filed under blog

Did you get to read the post from last week when we started talking about common sense? Well while that was about using common sense when getting help and advice from the professionals that support your business, this week, let’s talk about common sense when deciding what financial deals to get in on. Here is just a little more from my old publication, The Financial Freedom Report.

One definition of common sense is “what is sound and prudent but often unsophisticated”. I’ve seen many very sophisticated business decisions that have lost millions of dollars. To avoid financial traps, you need a huge dose of common sense, especially when those all around you are playing sophisticated and getting wrapped up with what is hot or in vogue. Common sense will keep you from being trapped or pushed or bullied or shocked into doing a deal that you don’t want to do.

There are many high powered, complex formulas for success and financial independence, most of which are so mind boggling it would take a PhD to understand them. Many of these formulas were written by people who never actually made big money themselves but sat back and watched others do it. From a spectator’s position they think they know the answers and then they make things so complex and involved that the average person cannot understand them. Take it from me, making a lot of money in a short period of time can be done with a simple game plan. I said simple not easy, since it takes tons of work. You are probably already working very hard but maybe not with the right game plan.

When I studied the lives and fortunes of two dozen millionaires and multi-millionaires, I was looking for a common denominator, something they all did that accounted for their success. I finally noticed factors that were present in almost every fortune. I slowly eliminated those factors that didn’t show up in every case. What I ended up with was basic and somewhat obvious, although it escapes 96 percent of those who look for it.

There are four essential ingredients, and I put them into a formula I call “PSIC”, which simply translates into P=Plan, S=Save, I=Invest, C=Compound. And I will add now in order to compound at high rates you need to use leverage.  

An insistent, fast-talking, and even somewhat logical person many times can persuade somebody to do something he doesn’t really want to do. If somebody asked you if you would like to get in on this super-hot deal that will pay you a 250 percent return without any risk and without a lot of your effort, what does your common sense tell you? Common sense should tell you that if a deal were really that good, the guy trying to sell you the deal and or the promoters behind him would probably not have trouble getting the needed money as a loan from a bank.

The simple fact is, those kinds of returns don’t exist. Yes, it is possible for you to get 100 and 200 and even higher percent returns, but not without a lot of work on your part and certainly not without any risk.  Deals like that don’t come all packaged neat and simple, especially without risk and without great effort on your part. Believe me it won’t happen! If I had a deal with a return like that (and I have had those kind of deals) you’d better believe that I would be able to borrow a whole lot of money, which I have done many times, even if I had to pay 2 or 3 times the going rate of interest. Common sense is recognizing reality and then acting accordingly.

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